bookmark_borderInstalling Linux kernel 6.0 on Ubuntu 22.10

Hello,

In this week’s feature highlight, we look at How to Install Linux kernel 6.0 on Ubuntu 22.10

Kernel is central component of an operating system that manages operations of computer and hardware. It basically manages operations of memory and CPU time. It is core component of an operating system. Kernel acts as a bridge between applications and data processing performed at hardware level using inter-process communication and system calls.

Step 1 – Update your system

First, Update the system packages to the latest versions using the below apt commands,

 apt update
 apt upgrade

Install some of the packages required for the Kernel upgrade,

 apt install gcc make perl wget

Step 2 – Installing Linux Kernel 6.0

By default on Ubuntu 22.10, The kernel version it ships with is version 5.19

Linux Kernel 6.0 is not available on Ubuntu 22.10 base repository. So we will manually download the required Linux Kernel packages from the official site and install.

You can check their official site for a list of available kernel versions that can be installed, kernel.ubuntu.com.

At the time of writing this article, version 6.0.9 was the only latest kernel we could install with.

If you find any newer versions that can be installed, please go ahead with it.

Some points to note, for selecting a different version of kernel.
Open the site kernel.ubuntu.com and scroll to the bottom of the page.
Find a version whose builds are successful, under that, navigate to “amd64” folder.
You will find the required four files to download on the ubuntu system, Linux Headers, Linux Image and Linux Modules.
A successful build looks like below:

Test amd64/build succeeded (rc=0, on=amd64, time=0:12:37, log=amd64/log)
amd64/linux-headers-6.0.9-060009-generic_6.0.9-060009.202211161102_amd64.deb
amd64/linux-headers-6.0.9-060009_6.0.9-060009.202211161102_all.deb
amd64/linux-image-unsigned-6.0.9-060009-generic_6.0.9-060009.202211161102_amd64.deb
amd64/linux-modules-6.0.9-060009-generic_6.0.9-060009.202211161102_amd64.deb

For upgrading to the latest kernel on Ubuntu, follow the given instructions:

wget https//:kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v6.0.9/amd64/linux-headers-6.0.9-060009_6.0.9060009.202211161102_all.deb

wget https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v6.0.9/amd64/linux-headers-6.0.9-060009-generic-6.0.9060009.202211161102_amd64.deb

wget https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v6.0.9/amd64/linux-image-unsigned-6.0.9-060009-generic_6.0.9060009.202211161102_amd64.deb

wget https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v6.0.9/amd64/linux-modules-6.0.9-060009-generic_6.0.9060009.202211161102_amd64.deb

Now, install the downloaded files using the dpkg command as shown below,

Ensure that there are no other .deb files apart from the ones that were downloaded.
If there are any other .deb files, recommended to remove them before proceeding.

dpkg -i *.deb

After installing the Linux Kernel 6.0, reboot the system to run the new Kernel

reboot

Step 3 – Verify the Kernel version

To verify the kernel installed and running after the reboot, use the uname command as shown below,

uname -r

Output:

root@vps:~# uname -r
6.0.9-060009-generic

This concludes the topic of installing the latest version of Kernel on a Ubuntu System.

bookmark_borderJanuary 2023 CentOS Templates Updated for KVM

Greetings, As part of our commitment to provide you with the latest and most ready-to-use service, we’ve updated the following templates for CentOS 7, CentOS 8-Stream, and CentOS 9-Stream.

This template update process ensures that any new VPS deployed will come along with the latest available packages so you don’t have to spend time running a large initial update.

As always, any existing VPS can be updated at any time by the user, you may follow our guide for the steps required to update your VPS, Click here.

If you require any assistance at any time, please feel free to contact our support team via the client area and we’ll help you out.

Follow us on CrownCloud BlogTwitter, and Facebook for updates regarding current offers and other updates.

Stay tuned for more! – Team CrownCloud

bookmark_borderAlmaLinux Templates Updated for KVM Plans

Greetings,

As part of our commitment to providing you with the latest and most ready-to-use service, we’ve updated our AlmaLinux Templates for AlmaLinux 8 and AlmaLinux 9.

This template update process ensures that any new VPS deployed will come along with the latest available packages so you don’t have to spend time running a large initial update.

As always, any existing VPS can be updated at any time by the user, you may follow our guide for the steps required to update your VPS, Click here.

If you require any assistance at any time, please feel free to contact our support team via the client area and we’ll help you out.

Follow us on the CrownCloud BlogTwitter, and Facebook for updates regarding current offers and other updates.

Stay tuned for further updates!

Team CrownCloud

bookmark_borderJanuary 2023 Rocky Linux Templates Updated for KVM

Greetings,

As part of our commitment to providing you with the latest and most ready-to-use service, we’ve updated the Rocky Linux Templates for Rocky Linux 8 and Rocky Linux 9.

This template update process ensures that any new VPS deployed will come along with the latest available packages so you don’t have to spend time running a large initial update.

As always, any existing VPS can be updated at any time by the user, you may follow our gfuide for the steps required to update your VPS, Click here.

If you require any assistance at any time, please feel free to contact our support team via the client area and we’ll help you out.

Follow us on CrownCloud BlogTwitter, and Facebook for updates regarding current offers and other updates.

Stay tuned for further updates!

Team CrownCloud

bookmark_borderJanuary 2023 ISOs Updated for KVM-Based Plans.

As part of our commitment to ensuring the latest operating system images are available for your usage, we have updated the ISOs for the following operating system images,

  • AlmaLinux 8/9
  • Rocky Linux 8/9
  • CentOS 7, 8-Stream, 9-Stream
  • Ubuntu 20.04, 21.04, 21.10, 22.04, 22.10
  • Archlinux x86_64
  • Debian 10/11 amd64
  • Fedora 36/37 x86_64
  • FreeBSD 12 amd64
  • gParted
  • GRML full
  • Netboot.xyz
  • SystemRescue CD
  • VirtIO Drivers

As always, any existing VPS can be updated at any time by the user, you may follow our guide for the steps required to update your VPS, Click here.

If you require any assistance at any time, please feel free to contact our support team via the client area and we’ll help you out.

Follow us on CrownCloud BlogTwitter, and Facebook for updates regarding current offers and other updates.

Stay tuned for further updates!

Team CrownCloud

bookmark_borderHow To Install and Configure Elasticsearch on Ubuntu 22.10

Hello,

In this week’s feature highlight, we look at How To Install and Configure Elasticsearch on Ubuntu 22.10

Elasticsearch is a platform for real-time, distributed data analysis. Because of its usability, potent features, and scalability, it is a well-liked option. Installing Elasticsearch, configuring it for your use case, securing your installation, and beginning to work with your Elasticsearch server.

First, check for any pending system upgrade

Let’s update software packages first. To perform updates, run the following command:

apt update
apt dist-upgrade

Install the APT HTTPS Transport package, with the following command,

apt install apt-transport-https

Install from APT Repository

Download and install the public signing key:

Wget -qo - https://artifacts.elastic.co/GPG-KEY-elasticsearch | sudo gpg --dearmor -o /usr/share/keyrings/elasticsearch-keyring.gpg

To Save the repository definition to

echo "deb [signed-by=/usr/share/keyrings/elasticsearch-keyring.gpg] https://artifacts.elastic.co/packages/8.x/apt stable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/elastic-8.x.list

Install Elasticsearch on Ubuntu 22.10

apt install elasticsearch

During the installation, you will be provided with the elastic superuser password. Kindly note it down for future usage.

Update Firewall Settings

Allow port 9200 for Elasticsearch by running the following ufw command

ufw allow from <yourserver.ip.address> to any port 9200

Enable the firewall service:

ufw enable

Next, view firewall service status:

ufw status

Configuring Elasticsearch

Let us configure Elasticsearch, we will edit its main configuration file elasticsearch.yml, which contains the majority of its configuration options. This file is located in the directory /etc/elasticsearch.

Edit the Elasticsearch configuration file with your preferred text editor. We’ll use nano in this case:

nano /etc/elasticsearch/elasticsearch.yml

Note: Elasticsearch’s configuration file is in YAML format, which means that we need to maintain the indentation format. Be sure that you do not add any extra spaces as you edit this file.

Output:

# Set the bind address to a specific IP (IPv4 or IPv6):
#
network.host: localhost
#

Because we specified localhost, Elasticsearch will listen on all interfaces and bound IPs. If you only want it to listen on one interface, use its IP address instead of localhost. Elasticsearch.yml should be saved and closed. If you’re using nano, you can do so by pressing CTRL+X, then Y, and finally ENTER.

These are the bare minimum settings you can use to get started with Elasticsearch. You can now launch Elasticsearch for the first time.

Systemctl will start the Elasticsearch service. Allow Elasticsearch a few moments to load. Otherwise, you may receive errors indicating that you are unable to

Start the Elasticsearchservice,

systemctl start elasticsearch

Enable the Elasticsearchservice,

systemctl enable elasticsearch

Verify that the Elasticsearch has been installed and running on the server by running the following command:

curl --cacert /etc/elasticsearch/certs/http_ca.crt -u elastic https://localhost:9200

You will be prompted to enter the password for the elastic user. Use the password that was provided to you during the installation from earlier.

Output:


root@vps:~# curl --cacert /etc/elasticsearch/certs/http_ca.crt -u elastic https://localhost:9200
Enter host password for user 'elastic':
{
  "name" : "vps.server.com",
  "cluster_name" : "elasticsearch",
  "cluster_uuid" : "HZcPm0lAQMCcsx94chOPPA",
  "version" : {
    "number" : "8.5.1",
    "build_flavor" : "default",
    "build_type" : "deb",
    "build_hash" : "c1310c45fc534583afe2c1c03046491efba2bba2",
    "build_date" : "2022-11-09T21:02:20.169855900Z",
    "build_snapshot" : false,
    "lucene_version" : "9.4.1",
    "minimum_wire_compatibility_version" : "7.17.0",
    "minimum_index_compatibility_version" : "7.0.0"
  },
  "tagline" : "You Know, for Search"
}
root@vps:~#

This concludes the Installation and Configure Elasticsearch on Ubuntu 22.10.